TexFab 5 – digital design

This winning submission to the TEX-FAB SKIN competition conducted design research on the structural properties of textured stainless steel sheeting, which typically is used for skinning and other non-structural purposes.

This winning submission to the TEX-FAB SKIN competition conducted design research on the structural properties of textured stainless steel sheeting, which typically is used for skinning and other non-structural purposes.

I’m at UT Austin, where I have not set foot since 1985, for a symposium today about digital design. I had a workshop yesterday, and will have another Saturday and Sunday. “This year TEX-FAB has elicited more of the world’s leading experts in Digital Fabrication to discuss and teach in a four day symposium at the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture.”

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Most of these experts use software like Rhino, Grasshopper, Kangaroo, Processing. I use Revit so I’m taking the Dynamo for Revit Workshop:

….Through the creation of an architectural design concept, we will engage BIM through cyclic, open ended computational design processes anchored in contemporary research on design thinking.

Software Required: Autodesk Revit and/or Vasari Beta 3, Dynamo (latest version), Excel

Screenshot from Day 2.  Excel file of structural point locations imported to generate geometry for adaptive component pipe space-truss.

Screenshot from Day 2. Excel file of structural point locations imported to generate geometry for adaptive component pipe space-truss.


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2 Responses to TexFab 5 – digital design

  1. John Hupp says:

    How was Dynamo? How does it compare to Grasshopper?

    • David Bogle says:

      Hey, thanks for the look and question. Dynamo is the visual programming language for Revit, but younger than Grasshopper. So, it’s much like Grasshopper was several years ago, when it was newer. Less sophistication in the GUI for sure, but the terminology is more straightforward/technical/mathematical which I like. Primarily, I love that it works with my main tool for architectural design, the BIM from big brother Autodesk.

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